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What is "duly authorized" peer review?

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Michigander

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Okay, in the Ethics Rule, Confidentiality section there is the verbiage regarding not disclosing confidential information or assignment results but allowance for "duly authorized professional peer review committee...", my question is, what exactly constitutes this "duly authorized professional" committee? Is it restricted to membership organizations such as the AI or NAIFA for example, or does it extend to an informal group that is trying to better themselves with feedback from other appraisers? Where is the line drawn?

Discussion please, I really want to hear opinions other than my own thoughts rattling around in my brain ;)
 

Louis Pompeo

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It's never an informal group. That would break Confidentiality.

Professional Peer Review Committees are professional societies, state licensing agencies, court appointed review appraisers and committees, etc.

There has to be a reason which serves the public, professional, or legal good in order for an appraiser to open his (her) file.

By the way, any of those committees are sworn to the same confidentiality that we subscribe to.
 

stefan olafson

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It's the state appraisal board above others. It allows the state unfettered access to all your files and information. They can really make things interesting for you if they want to. To a lesser extent it's the professional society you may belong to or the courts.

The state needs absolutely no reason whatsoever to request your files, they (at least in North Dakota) may begin an investigation against (or into) (a freudian slip?) any licensee in the state and they can ask for any or all.
 

Metamorphic

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It's never an informal group. That would break Confidentiality.

Professional Peer Review Committees are professional societies, state licensing agencies, court appointed review appraisers and committees, etc.

That stretches the definition of the word "peer" to a Clintonian level.
 

leelansford

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Illinois
Okay, in the Ethics Rule, Confidentiality section there is the verbiage regarding not disclosing confidential information or assignment results but allowance for "duly authorized professional peer review committee...", my question is, what exactly constitutes this "duly authorized professional" committee? Is it restricted to membership organizations such as the AI or NAIFA for example, or does it extend to an informal group that is trying to better themselves with feedback from other appraisers? Where is the line drawn?

Discussion please, I really want to hear opinions other than my own thoughts rattling around in my brain ;)

If it is an "informal group", merely redact all information that identifies the client and the subject property. I don't believe that an "informal peer review committee" is what the authors had in mind when they penned those words.
 

Michigander

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Michigan
What about the review in writing Lee?

I agree with redacting all confidential information but wonder if it goes far enough. There has got to be a way of appraisers helping each other become more critical thinkers without crossing lines.

Thanks guys, keep it coming.
 

Metamorphic

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California
What about the review in writing Lee?

I agree with redacting all confidential information but wonder if it goes far enough. There has got to be a way of appraisers helping each other become more critical thinkers without crossing lines.

Thanks guys, keep it coming.

What about if I pay you a dollar as an informal appraisal consulting assignment with no opinion of value to review my work, and you pay me a dollar for an informal appraisal consulting assignment with no opinion of value to review your work? You'd have to keep a file and the necessary confidentiality strictures.
 

Mike Garrett RAA

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Colorado
What about if I pay you a dollar as an informal appraisal consulting assignment with no opinion of value to review my work, and you pay me a dollar for an informal appraisal consulting assignment with no opinion of value to review your work? You'd have to keep a file and the necessary confidentiality strictures.


OK, lets pick this one apart...
A review is a review, it's not a consulting assignment

The intent of the rule's language was to allow for an appraiser who must submit appraisals for review with the intent of demonstrating proficiency to a recognized organization such as The Appraisal Institute. I do not believe that extends to just anyone or any informal group of appraisers. I also believe that it does not apply to appraiser boards as they are mentioned in addition to peer review.

When I had my company, I would "review" the reports of other appraisers in my company. Did that violate confidentiality? I don't think so. Perhaps this would be a good topic for a Q & A from the standards board.
 

Don Clark

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Virginia
OK, lets pick this one apart...
A review is a review, it's not a consulting assignment

The intent of the rule's language was to allow for an appraiser who must submit appraisals for review with the intent of demonstrating proficiency to a recognized organization such as The Appraisal Institute. I do not believe that extends to just anyone or any informal group of appraisers. I also believe that it does not apply to appraiser boards as they are mentioned in addition to peer review.

When I had my company, I would "review" the reports of other appraisers in my company. Did that violate confidentiality? I don't think so. Perhaps this would be a good topic for a Q & A from the standards board.

Actually Mike, I believe they would pretty much use the same logic you used. I would just add that an informal peer review committee is not, by it's very nature, duly authorized by anyone. I realize that the OP likely has in mind such a group as has been formed on this forum. I would contend that you cannot call yourself a duly authorized peer review committee.

When i review another appraisers work, at the request of that appraiser, then testify as an expert witness before a state board, or in a court of law, it is always as a reviewer, never as a consultant or as an advocate even tho the appraiser, not the state or the court has hired me. I can, under those circumstances, only be an advocate for my own work.
 
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