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Why even take on a trainee?

Russ Kitzberger

Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2007
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Ohio
If you are looking for a CG mentor Enroll in a graduate program that larger firms recruit from. McKissock is great for those who need remote learning because they are training under someone already or for continuing education.

There are two areas that might be worthwhile, first is big data and automation: I would take on a trainee if they had all their courses done and could multi-stack program. Although, if a candidate had that skill set, they could make $100-150k in other professional areas in real estate risk and finance working on their computer systems. You could take a 6 month course and gain that programming education.

The second is litigation support, so I look for people who can contribute to litigation work, someone with construction or engineering experience that has a contact database of clients that sue each other over construction, insurance, and value diminution issues. That would be something for someone that is burnt out from construction management and wants a flexible schedule.

Neither of these is traditional lending appraisal-related, that profession is fading. Banks keep increasing the loan amount that qualifies for commercial evaluations and residential evaluations/desktops/AVM's will increase in % of loans soon. Use of evals supported by big data risk analysis will result in only the complicated projecting being valued by an appraiser and the public isn't going to accept the "application" fees that are necessary to keep a professional practice feasible only completing the tough ones.
 

NP_MAI

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2018
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
You want to be a CG and you are taking McKissock classes. There is your first mistake.

Write a letter like we did in the old days telling your qualifications and what you can bring to the table and what commitment you are willing to make. Send it snail mail. Follow up with a phone call. The average appraiser has been over the age of 50 for over four decades and we don't want a phone call or an e-mail we will instantly delete.
Great advice! I prepared an email and blind copied all the recipients with my qualifications and some insight into my work ethic and what I could bring to the table. I sent this to about 50 MAIs across Florida and was able to secure over 10 interviews.

You state that you are trying to find a Cert Gen, but reference form reports. Are you trying to be a commercial or residential appraiser? This is something you need to answer before marketing yourself.

If you want to be a residential appraiser, then you would focus on SRAs or maybe some farm and AG folks? Help me out forum....

If commercial, reach out to a bunch of MAIs and interview them. Ask the questions you want answered and let them know that you are willing to work your tail off. Realize that anyone that takes you one will need 3-4 years from you to break-even on their time investment in training you. Don't talk about becoming a competitor, IMHO you probably wont be ready to run your own shop for 5-10 years depending on what route you go, so there is no sense in raising red flags during the interview process.

Hope this helps.
 

Russ Kitzberger

Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2007
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Ohio
Great advice! I prepared an email and blind copied all the recipients with my qualifications and some insight into my work ethic and what I could bring to the table. I sent this to about 50 MAIs across Florida and was able to secure over 10 interviews.

You state that you are trying to find a Cert Gen, but reference form reports. Are you trying to be a commercial or residential appraiser? This is something you need to answer before marketing yourself.

If you want to be a residential appraiser, then you would focus on SRAs or maybe some farm and AG folks? Help me out forum....

If commercial, reach out to a bunch of MAIs and interview them. Ask the questions you want answered and let them know that you are willing to work your tail off. Realize that anyone that takes you one will need 3-4 years from you to break-even on their time investment in training you. Don't talk about becoming a competitor, IMHO you probably wont be ready to run your own shop for 5-10 years depending on what route you go, so there is no sense in raising red flags during the interview process.

Hope this helps.
Great insight Ned, I conur the OP needs to decide if they want to be CG generalist or a Res, etc.

Perhaps the OP could intern with a few, answering phone calls, etc if they need help choosing a path.
One thing you can definitely do to help your mentor (if he needs or wants that kind of help) is to offer to be his/her driver all the time in addition to when you are going out on your own inspection, so that they can use the usual wasted drive time to work on their laptop.
If you are doing FNMA forms, how are you meeting the scope of work for "inspecting the neighborhood" if you are on your laptop?
 
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