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Wildcat Sewage System

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JTip

Thread Starter
Elite Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Pennsylvania
Trying to finish up the workweek and browsing the latest download on the MLS.

Looks like a two family closed up on the mountain. The sewage system is called "Wildcat". Never heard of such a system and I know there are no public utilites up there....so I search and find: http://www.geocities.com/strippens/McAdoo.html

Wow...there has got to be a law...or something...:shrug:
 

JRS at OBX

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Jun 13, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
North Carolina
Looks like a good place to sell paddles.
 

G-man

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Joined
Feb 4, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Ohio
I wonder if that would pass FHA? No obvious signs of sewage problems. If you weren't aware of this type of sewage system, how would you know to check a pipe several hundred feet from the home?
 

Mike Boyd

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Joined
Jan 18, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
California
Definately an environmental hazard as well as a health hazard. Is your subject part of this system?
 

Lloyd Bonafide

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Incredibly, there are still places in the U.S. where untreated sewage is discharged into creeks.

http://www.spokesmanreview.com/news-story.asp?date=111802&ID=s1255778



BURKE, Idaho _ A conspicuous stretch of white PVC pipe snakes its way down the Burke Canyon hillside, past the black shattered planks of wood from abandoned mines.

On one end, the pipe disappears into a mine shaft. On the other, it feeds into Bob Sizemore's kitchen sink, in a blue-gray trailer home. Sizemore drinks this water.

And he's fine with that.

"The EPA tested this water," says Sizemore, decked out in denim, puffing a cigarette. "They said it's some of the finest water in the valley."

Now, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has ordered a Burke water system to comply with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act, by installing a filter in Sawmill Gulch. That could cost residents on that system $19,000 apiece. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and the Panhandle Health District are pushing for a multimillion-dollar sewer line. Residents of half of the homes here simply flush their sewage into Canyon Creek. The sewer line price tag is $48,000 per each of the 79 residences.


"I think they're nuts," says Chuck Tirpik, an outspoken critic of government agencies in general. "A lot of these people don't even have $20. I realize raw sewage shouldn't be dumping into the creek. But 50 years ago, there were 5,000 people here. Every one of them dumped into the creek. The water quality isn't that bad.
 

Lee in L.A.

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
They say old mines are hazardous, but I never heard of that reason before. Nasty. :rof:
 

Urbanz

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Texas
Wow, Im starting a new career, Wildcatter Sewers, Inc. I just need a bulldozer and a pack of cigarettes.
 
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