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Will trainees have to pay their mentors for education in the future?

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wickedness1

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2007
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Ohio
In the future (a couple of years from now) when the skippies are gone & the market is starting to stablize more..(I know I'm daydreaming here, lol)

Do you guy/gals think that the appraisal profession (us) will re-think this trainee situation and trainees will have to pay their mentors an upfront fee to get training hours? Kind of like paying a college for education?
$10k-$50k for education?

I've thought about it alot and I think thats where it might head because of IRS implications on mentors to "employ" trainees (instead of sub-contractors) and issues like trainees seeking unemployment compensation, etc. and then becoming our competition once we've trained them, etc, etc, etc.

What do you guys think? Has anyone ever heard of a mentor being paid by a trainee to be taught?? Just curious:unsure:
 

philip

Sophomore Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
California
huh

may be but who knows
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Montana
AQB Practicum-"Pay to Play"

In the future (a couple of years from now) when the skippies are gone & the market is starting to stablize more..(I know I'm daydreaming here, lol)

Do you guy/gals think that the appraisal profession (us) will re-think this trainee situation and trainees will have to pay their mentors an upfront fee to get training hours? Kind of like paying a college for education?
$10k-$50k for education?

:

The AQB has stepped up to the plate with the issuance of AQB Guide Note 4. This calls for allowing states to approve Practicum Courses that allow for up to 50% of the experience credit from non-client work. Two states so far have approved this concept. This means that a person can pay to get up to 1000 hours of experience if seeking a license.

In the future there will be a two tier mentoring system. The primary mentor system will be as it now. The second level will consist of organizations who will sponsor courses in which an appraiser can receive experience. Those wanting to become appraisers, will have to "pay to play."

Once these courses work their way into the system, It will be common for appraisers to charge for training and working with appraisal candidates on their experience requirements. The existing system is flawed and medieval in concept. The root cause of most the incompetence in the system is appraisal candidates have not been mentored properly. Once this system is on a paying basis and candidates "pay to play' the system is bound to improve. If the trainee has to pay for their experience, they are likely to demand better training.

Presently, appraisal candidates are supplicants needing a handout and victims of either no pay or low pay. They get what they pay for which is generally little to no supervision. The next generation of appraisers will be older persons in a second career, retired military persons or persons who have a disability settlement. The costs have already gone up with the need for many more courses and some states abandoning the lower license category.
 

TXCBoy36

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2007
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
That is an interesting concept....most people getting into this business are trying for a new start and do not have alot of funds....this concept should really shorten the list of trainees quite a bit.

JC
 

wickedness1

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2007
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Ohio
If the trainee has to pay for their experience, they are likely to demand better training.

This is exactly my thoughts. I can see future mentors making a "real living" off of training trainees and the "skippy" mindset dwindling especially if seasoned appraisers can make a good living training instead of "milling".
 

DTB

Elite Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Illinois
What do you guys think? Has anyone ever heard of a mentor being paid by a trainee to be taught?? Just curious:unsure:

About as likely as someone developing on outfitting business for snipe hunters. :Eyecrazy:
 

Chrispy

Freshman Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2005
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
frustrated trainee

OK - we as trainees already work for peanuts when you do descide to give us an order. No one really wants to take on a trainee. If someone is considering taking on a trainee - they expect trainee to arrive with their own clients and are willing to go find new clients. OH- BTW- many of you chastise when trainee is trying to find clients. So changing mentors is next to impossible.
Education requirements have greatly increased and along with that increases cost of education.
We finally have education, experience hours and big bills racked up from lack of income, get our license and you offer us a measly 5-10% increase in split. Then you wonder why we want to go on our own and become your competition.
Yes, the system is broken.
2 1/2 years ago I wanted to become an appraiser. I thought this would be a great way to use my 15+ years in real estate and 30+ years living in this market. Now, I am with a great teacher/mentor who is ethical and thorugh BUT has no business. No one else will hire me because I do not have clients as I spent the last 2 1/2 years learning how to properly do appraisals instead of marketing. If I do not finish my hours this year, I will have start all over with education requirements. I am damn good at what I do. I know this market better than most appraisers, realtors and analyists. Yet, after all this time, education, and working for peanuts - I am going to have to get a real job and toss it all in the can. Very frustrating.
Yes, the system is broken. Unfortunatly, the buracracy needed to change it will be slow if it gets changed at all.
 

TEL2002

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
Louisiana
When I was going through my classes in 95/96 I had an instructor that offered something along that line. You paid him $500 and he would guarantee you 500 hours of work for your experience log. He limited this 'opportunity' to 10 trainees at a time. I almost did it, but the drive to his market area was about 65 miles one way & I did have a full time job.

3-4 years ago the state busted him for signing many appraisals as did inspect when he was never at the property. Sure glad I did not take him up on his offer. Trainees are naive & do not know all of the "in's and out's" and the way everything should be done. Maybe this should be a mandatory first class...."What's right and what's wrong as your undergo your appraisal training".
 

Ray Miller

Elite Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Wisconsin
I would thinks so.

How many here have paid for 2, 4, 6, 8 and more years of college?????

I see nothing wrong with the concept. The senior appraiser is passing out his or her knowledge, taking time away from there pratice and taking the risk. Someone should pay for it.

Nothing in life is free that I know of.

Once you have the education, then you start to work for peanuts until you can prove yourself and increase your income.

Matter of fact I think it would help the profession a great deal.

When I started in the Farrier profession, I paid for my college education in Equine Science and Farrier Science. Then I went to work for a Master Farrier as an Apprentice. I served under a number of Masters for a total of six years. These Masters, covered Farrier and Wheelwright. I was not even making a living that even paid my living expense. After working all day 5 1/2 days a week. I would hire out to ride greenhorses, mules and clean stalls to make ends meet. I also had some income from rodeos.

After people found out I knew what I was doing, my income increased and I moved up the food chain.
 
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Brad Ellis

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
wicked,

Some trainees already offer to pay. Many years ago during a down cycle I knew of appraisers who only took on trainees if they worked for free- and that is really tantamount to paying for the education.

So, yes, I'd not be surprised if that happened although I would not expect it to become a norm.

Brad
 
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