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Pilgrum

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Nevada
I recently agreed to take on an intern. At 70 years old you would think I would know better.
This person had absolutely zero real estate knowledge. You know...... Simple stuff. Things like Lot and Block, Meets and Bounds, Township and Range. Or. T-111. Roof types. Window types.
So my question is; Should some type of class or experience level in the basics be required?
 

bnmappraisal

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2011
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
Check out this thread about "surpervisors" and "trainees" (I definitely DON'T endorse the program - I actually don't like it) I do think it pertains to your thread here though

https://appraisersforum.com/forums/threads/appraisal-start-program.217233/

As far as training, I haven't trained anyone yet, so can't directly answer. But I would like to think that anyone I potentially would train (and I've had a couple people call me) would have some sort of RE knowledge (both did, albeit limited).

To your OP regarding "should some type of class or experience...be required?" I think it would depend on the supervisor/mentor. For me, at 36, I think I may have the "time" to spend training someone from scratch. (Definitely no offense to you Pilgrum!) At 70, I don't think I'd have the same mentality; I'd expect if I'm going to train someone, they better damn well have at least SOME basics.
 

Meandering

Elite Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2006
Professional Status
Real Estate Agent or Broker
State
Pennsylvania
I recently agreed to take on an intern. At 70 years old you would think I would know better.
This person had absolutely zero real estate knowledge. You know...... Simple stuff. Things like Lot and Block, Meets and Bounds, Township and Range. Or. T-111. Roof types. Window types.
So my question is; Should some type of class or experience level in the basics be required?

Tell them to take the sales person class, or to at least get a hold of the text book and read it.

That'll give them the verbage, estates, tenancy, easements, metes and bounds, and all the very basics, plus a little math.

.
 
Joined
Jun 2, 2007
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
My family made me work a year in construction and real estate sales before I could join the business. That and USMC boot camp were the best preparation for life as a young adult, but I think they just wanted to be sure I was serious.

Either way, yes, minimums should be required before beginning appraisal training IMO.
 

reviewbe

Sophomore Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2016
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
California
So, how long do you expect to keep working? Seems like that's an awful lot of training for you to do, would take years possibly starting from scratch. Agree with Mr. Rhodes, have them get a real estate license, get the minimum accomplished by someone else. Then you can just add to that and/or correct all the mis-learned stuff.
 

AMF13

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
I think I'd want them to have a basic RE class plus at least 1 or 2 more advanced and appraisal related. :shrug:
 

Elliott

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Oregon
So my question is; Should some type of class or experience level in the basics be required?

Not according to the ASB. Reminds me of a Randy Newman song,

"And college men from LSU
Went in dumb - come out dumb too
Hustlin' 'round Atlanta in their alligator shoes..."

 

Riick

Elite Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Delaware
I took on a trainee once, required that trainee take the AI's basic appraisal course first
to demonstrate commitment & gain basic knowledge

Somehow my trainee was consistently unable to figure out whether a house had gas or oil heat.
I pointed out the typical 1/2-inch (or larger) cast iron pipe leading gas into the gas furnace,
and the 1/4-inch Soft-Copper line leading fuel-oil into the oil burner a half-dozen times.
How anyone could miss such an obvious difference is beyond me.
But, they never "got" it, at which point I knew: This trainee not-long for the appraisal world.

BTW - this person had a Masters degree in Special Education. << shrug >>
 

Gobears81

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2013
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Illinois
I was under the impression that trainees needed Appraisal Principles, Appraisal Procedures, and a 15-hour USPAP class before a trainee license was received, which is why I asked if the use of the term intern was synonymous with trainee. Our office has part-time "interns" that attend college and most of them don't understand many of these issues also. But, they are doing mostly clerical duties, rather than appraisal-related duties.

The two non-USPAP classes covers some of the items which the OP mentioned (lot & block/ metes & bounds), or at least it did when I took it. The procedures class covers some construction characteristics. With that said, I believe that the construction aspect should be expanded on in these classes before a trainee can start appraising.
 
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