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Common Wall

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Kevin Darland

Thread Starter
Freshman Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Kentucky
I did an appraisal inspection today and the subject has a 1 car detached garage that has a common wall (retaining wall) with the adjoining property. This is mentioned in the deed (metes and bounds), and I guess I am concerned that I need:

1. A survey to accurately show the property lines and to ensure that the garage is indeed on the subjects site and

2. The roof of the garage (the building that the garage adjoins appears to like a shop of some sort) is in need of replacement---it has 2 or 3 layers of shingles on it now and there were bits and pieces of the roof on the ground

So, my question is: Do I need a survey and how do I handle the roof of the garage---I would GUESS that it would be a shared expense between the owner (or purchaser--however they agreed) and the existing owner of the other property---however, the other property is a FSBO, and I would GUESS that they probably wouldnt want the expenses right now.

There are a few other issues with the house and it is going to have a home inspection that I am going to hold off on finishing the appraisal until I can see the report, so I thought I would ask you all how you would handle this.

Thanks
Kevin
 

Ray Ohler

Sophomore Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Are very common here with all the attached or "row" houses. They don't negatively impact marketability. I think it would be beyond the scope of the appraisal to call for a survey each and every time. As long as the wall is in "average" repair I wouldn't worry about it UNLESS it was an unusual occurrence there. The roof of the garage I didn't quite understand. You said in the area where it adjoins; adjoins what? The party wall or a wall of the subject garage? If the shingles don't overlap the neighbor's garage I would just treat it as deferred maintenance. If they do, and the wall is just a "pent" toof, well then, that's your call.
 

Kevin Darland

Thread Starter
Freshman Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Kentucky
Sorry for not giving better detail---The roof of the garage is incorporated into the adjoining neighbors building---almost like they were built at the same time. I dont see how, for example, the subject owner could ONLY take off the shingles over the garage without touching the shingles on the other building. I hope that helps clairify it. Thanks for your help Ray.
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
Florida
Kevin,

Hope you took pictures.

I would state the roof condition with an estimated cost to cure. A roof can be done and just stop where the property line/common wall is. This won't look good for the FSBO next door but, that's not your problem. :)

Or, you could could state:
Due to the condition of the garage, it is given no value in this Appraisal and Report.
This doesn't sound like a 0 lot line subdivision since the legal is metes and bounds so here's another one for you.
This Appraisal and Report is based on the extraordinary assumption that there are no encroachments and is subject to a current survey to verify. The subject detached garage appears to be on or close to the boundary line and shares a common wall with the adjoining property.
:wink:

Yep, I'd want a good look at the home inspection report.
you do need to list the defects with an estimated cost to cure and give a condition adjustment relecting what you believe the 'typical' buyer would deduct for those needed or necessary repairs. Anybody want to tackle the definition of typical??? 8O

Good Luck! Hope I helped.
 

Ray Ohler

Sophomore Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Kevin, yes you CAN replace "half" the shingles by cutting them off with a utility knife. Then, wait for the neighbor to file the lawsuit. Here, "zero" lot lines refer to two distinct walls situated on the property lines, not a "party" wall which "straddles" the line. It SOUNDS like you may have a "pent" roof over the garage (to "enhance" for architectural effect not necessarily a "functional" roof which is structural in nature). At any rate, I would definitely wait for the inspection report, although some "home inspectors", well, I'll save that for another post. Funny story. Here, a lot of "row" homes (especially one built in the 20's, 30's and 40's) have common walkways and front steps many of which are in pretty rough shape. Unless it's a safety hazard, it usually does not impact marketability. TO BE CONTINUED. I don't want to get logged off.
 

Randy Beigh

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Kevin

Some good answers.

I would worry about a survey. I would disclose what you saw and any concerns you might have about marketability in your market. If this is uncommon, there can be a problem. If, as others have said, it is common, it may not be.

I think disclosure is most important and if there is a marketability issue, then an adjustment may be needed.

This is my first post in this new format. Hope it works.
 

jtrotta

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
All good information, just my 2 cents; if there exists a common wall then it would appear to me that some legal document must be around somewhere that distingushes who or whom is responsible for what (we don't have that much of what your describing) but we have an ample # of condos.; in that scenerio, the documents point out directly what you are responsible for and what the association is responsible for. These documents are all written by attorneys. I may be wrong but what your describing sounds like a "Legal" issue.
 

Pat Butler

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Illinois
I'd call your client (I assume the lender in this situation) and see what documents they have regarding the common wall situation. Then ask them if they want you to appraise it as if though the common wall situation has been correctly set up in a legal sense. If so, use an assumption in your report stating that is is assumed the common wall situation has been correctly set up.

Pat
 
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