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Ditchs On Dirt Roads

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Barry Kirsch

Freshman Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2003
We just did an inspection on a rural property... they had these very deep ditchs along the roadway, which is dirt... I see these ditches alot up here in Michigan...my question is this: on a 1004, there is the area for storm sewers, I think I know what those are in the city, but it is my uderstanding that these ditches provide the same function,

Not a big issue, just a little detail I want to be right...

thanks!
 

Blue1

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Storm sewers are (I believe) for flood abatement in low lying areas in cities with high density populations and a lot of paved road surfaces where rain storms could cause flooding.

Rural roads usually have 'crowned' road surfaces and ditches at either side of the road to handle the run-off.

The two are completely different....made for different purposes. Concrete curbing is more akin to road ditches.
 

Mountain Man

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
Like Blue said, storm sewer is not the same as ditches. I put "none" or "ditch" in that little space.
 

EDWARD BERRY

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Arkansas
IN ARKANSAS we use the term "bar ditches" in that blank.

works for us. arkie ed
 

Restrain

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
If you can fish crawdads out, it's a bar ditch. If it's too dry to fish crawdads out of, it's a plain ditch. :D
 

Tim Hicks (Texas)

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Texas
How about "storm ditch" on the line and no box checked. If they have a propane tank, I Put "propane" and no check box. "private septic" or "aerobic septic" and no box checked.


Next question.
 

Wally Jones

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
If you can gig frogs or catch crawdads in it, it's a redneck crick. If it's near the coast and has mullet in it, it's a coastal tributary. If it's within sight of a manufactured home that has more than two inoperable vehicles in the yard and it's rained in the last two weeks, it's a swimmin' pool. B)

As I recall from my days in west Texas, if it rains in the hills for more than a couple of hours, them ditches turn into whitewater rivers! And in a hurry! :mrgreen:
 

Daniel Williams

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Appraiser Trainee
State
Illinois
I call'm "swale ditches" but then again...thats just me... <_<

dsw
 

Mike Garrett RAA

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
barrow pits....here. I don't comment about them cept when I run off the road into one, then I, ahhhh, ohhh never mind
 
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