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Federal Buildings Proposed to be Built in Greek Federalist Style as a Default

WestMichiganCG

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Michigan
What is "creative" about box structures? The advantage is cost. My alma mater built a bunch of dorms. The oldest two were still in use when I left - pre WWII. The newest two were 11 years old when one was repurposed as a custodial building, the second was torn down. They had been built as an experiment to provide cheap housing. They were a constant headache with damaged walls, fixtures, etc. Both are gone today. My dorm is gone...about 35 years. Brick and block dreariness. narrow halls, no elevator, etc. But at least brick and concrete block.

But if a building lasts 100-150 years vs one that lasts 40 - 50 years, it seems an advantage. Remodeling is normally cheaper than rebuilding every few decades. When we gauge the quality of a dwelling, we don't necessarily concentrate upon the garish features, the lick and stick stone, 5 types of exterior siding (I hate those the worst), 14 different roof pitches, or remotely operated ceiling fans. Remember the built in 8 track sound systems? Stone is stone, wood has to grow back. I really hate glass walls on tall buildings. But if we are going to build a cheap box building without character or with some garish dated look, we might as well hire Morton to build us some metal barns and call them public buildings.
There is a lot of creativity in structures, they don't all have to be boxes. I don't have a problem with the Federal Style but it's not going to look great everywhere. Maybe the Feds don't need to have a building last that long. Maybe they could retrofit an old mall or movie theater. I am a fan of life cycle cost analysis though. If you think there's a good chance the building will be in continued use 150 years from now than you can justify higher quality materials. From personal experience, mandates can get expensive.
 

Terrel L. Shields

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rom personal experience, mandates can get expensive.
True enough but government pays several times over for things anyway. The local Christian college has a pleasing blend of new and old that is fine, but the U of A has a mix of styles that really clashes. but there are some buildings I find to be garish and awful and they tend to be boring "modernist" or just plain ugly. This Russian building is held out as a typical example of just plain ugly. Some of the weirdest are in the middle East but the question is how functional are they, and how long will they last? Are they even built to last. Not to mention top heavy buildings tend to be very low earthquake resistant structures.

1581690914296.png
 

Mark K

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Indiana
Well built, well thought-out designs, not the 'flavor of the month' from the national architecture schools, are designs that will look appealing 100 years from now. I'm not saying they should all be exactly the same but since its taxpayer money, the buildings should be attractive, functional and built to last a long time.

The Carnegie Libraries, over 2,500 total, are great examples that come to mind. There are still many of them standing after over 100 years and they look impressive. The library they built in this town about 20 years ago will not last another 30 or 40 but the old Carnegie library down the street, now over 100 years old and repurposed looks great.

The federal office building in Indpls built in 1976 looks dated and I'd be surprised is it makes it another 20 yrs. OTOH, the classic federal courthouse built in 1902 still looks impressive.
 

glenn walker

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Large single level windowless concrete tilt up boxes- Located in razor wired and fenced , compounds. So as not to one up each other, all employees to wear, standard , Mao Zedong , green uniforms, with their Federal Rank GS-10 - GS-15 on both shirt sleeves. Standard protocol to be all Fed Employees would greet the public with , thank you tax payor for your service and a salute :)
 

Lee in L.A.

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Large single level windowless concrete tilt up boxes- Located in razor wired and fenced , compounds. So as not to one up each other, all employees to wear, standard , Mao Zedong , green uniforms, with their Federal Rank GS-10 - GS-15 on both shirt sleeves. Standard protocol to be all Fed Employees would greet the public with , thank you tax payor for your service and a salute :)
Employees, not prisoners. :leeann:

They don't build 'em like they used to. Maybe federal buildings should all be quonset huts.
 

ucbruin

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Massachusetts
True enough but government pays several times over for things anyway. The local Christian college has a pleasing blend of new and old that is fine, but the U of A has a mix of styles that really clashes. but there are some buildings I find to be garish and awful and they tend to be boring "modernist" or just plain ugly. This Russian building is held out as a typical example of just plain ugly. Some of the weirdest are in the middle East but the question is how functional are they, and how long will they last? Are they even built to last. Not to mention top heavy buildings tend to be very low earthquake resistant structures.

View attachment 43681

1581768352773.png 1581768448003.png

On the left UCLA main campus...............On the right Bunche Hall (“The Waffle”)

Compared to the main campus buildings Bunche Hall did seem "ugly" to me....
But once you were able to view it over the horizon, you knew you were only a few minutes away from your destination....

Similar to driving down the 5 freeway to Disneyland back in the '60's....
At the time not many highrise buildings blocking ones views....
The game of "who will be the 1st to see the tip of the Matterhorn"....
 

Terrel L. Shields

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Arkansas
At the top of the hill on the U of A campus in Fayetteville, you see the towers of "Old Main"...(it was blurred in the background of a scene in the movie "The Blue and the Gray" circa 1982ish.) You can see it from N, S, E...part of W. This shot is from the northeast. My office was in the north tower 2nd floor in grad school. It was undergoing renovations and needed them badly.
1581793600565.png
 

Renee Healion

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It was old when Henry VIII used it!
 

Lee in L.A.

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What a deal. :leeann2:

The Winnie the Pooh House

Guide price: £2m
 
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