• Welcome to AppraisersForum.com, the premier online  community for the discussion of real estate appraisal. Register a free account to be able to post and unlock additional forums and features.

FHA And Floor Furnaces

Status
Not open for further replies.

Nick1985

Thread Starter
Freshman Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2016
Professional Status
Appraiser Trainee
State
Kentucky
Have a possible order coming my way for a residence with a floor furnaces as the only heat source. I don't see anything in the FHA regards that specifically say that floor furnaces do not qualify... They are permanently affixed and for a small house they can sufficiently heat the home. They wouldn't be typical for the market area, but I would just put it in the same group as all other non-central heating sources. "Other" types of heat sources only make up a small percentage of the market, but they are present.

I remember from my great grandmother's old house that the grates over the furnace could get hot enough to burn your feet if barefoot which could be a safety concern. I came across some article of an appraiser talking about how he only considered them qualifying if the source was not located directly in a walking path, so it would have to be just beside or along a wall and not in the middle of a hallway.

Anyone have any experience dealing with floor furnaces that could provide some insight? Any special conditions required to qualify or other safety concerns?
 

Lee in L.A.

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
I think as long as it works and heats "adequately" it's OK.
 

hillbillyman

Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
West Virginia
FHA - Automatically heat the living areas of the house to a minimum of 50 degrees Fahrenheit in all GLAs, as well as in non-GLAs containing building or system components subject to failure or damage due to freezing. I believe this was relayed by FHA as passing the test - if the door of a room was shut is there adequate heat to the room? VA - based on a case where the VA made a loan on an Amish home, the heat only needs to be in areas where water/plumbing is present. Fannie - if its adequate and accepted by the market - The improvements should conform to the neighborhood in terms of age, type, design, and materials used for their construction. If there is market resistance to a property because its improvements are not compatible with the neighborhood or with the requirements of the competitive market because of adequacy of plumbing, heating, or electrical services; design; quality; size; condition; or any other reason directly related to market demand, the appraiser must address the impact to the value and marketability of the subject property.
 

glenn walker

Elite Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
They are allowed-and before the fifties almost all homes came with wall or floor furnaces.
 

hillbillyman

Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
West Virginia
Attended an FHA training session put on by HUD. Official teaching stated if you shut a door the heat system must be able to maintain 55 in the room. I had a VA property with only a buck stove. VA stated areas with plumbing (kitchen and baths) must maintain adequate heat.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Find a Real Estate Appraiser - Enter Zip Code

Copyright © 2000-, AppraisersForum.com, All Rights Reserved
AppraisersForum.com is proudly hosted by the folks at
AppraiserSites.com
Top

AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks