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FHA Inspection: Bedrooms

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Ben Vukicevich SRA

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
New Jersey
Here's what I do. Stuff needed: Flashlight and nightlight

1) Check the light switch for operation. If no ceiling fixture,look for the outlet controlled by the wall switch. Once we have some light, we scan the ceiling for water stains. We give the ceiling and walls a once over looking for any bulges, cracks, holes, damage, etc. If such is present, you condition for the repair. The decoration does not have to be fresh but the walls and ceiling sould be in sound condition, ready for a coat of paint by the new owner, if they so desire.

I then go for the windows, all of them, to check for proper operation and to check for peeling lead based paint between the main windows and the storm windows. The only way you can check for peeling lead based window paint is to open all of them so I disregard the FHA requirement of one "tested" thingee in a room because you know the AQA reviewer will test the one that you didn't, right. :lol: You also do not want to see broken sash cords, chains, whatever system is used to hold up the windows. No broken window glass either. Check for burglar bars. If present, they must be installed to local code so call for the local inspection to get you off the hook. Check for proper window egress. We don't want windows installed at the ceiling line or jalousie windows that have no egress possibilities. The room is not a habitable bedroom by HUD/FHA standards, if there is no egress possible case of a fire. It may sound stupid, but check for crank handles on casement or awning window types-got to have them to open the window to get out right-and it's part of your window testing procedure anyway..

Moving down we check for proper operation of the outlets with the nightlight. We look for signs of system overload/inadequacy such as burned/melted outlets. If no outlet, then one must be installed. All outlets and switches must have protective covers/plates. Look for a heat source. In the old days, the room had to have a heat supply which meant a heat vent or radiator, now FHA wants a heat source, so I guess leaving the bedroom door open counts as a heat source.

Check the finish flooring for a 2 year remaining life. If carpeting is worn or has holes, condition for repair if possible or replacement.

Check the wood trim and door for chipping/peeling lead base paint.

Check inside the closet to see if there is anything funky in there like amateur electrical wiring.

Check for proper operation of electric baseboard heat, if present and make sure all protective covers are on the baseboard units.

Things I don't like to see are: Gas or oil fired domestic hot water heaters or home heaters in the bedrooms or bedroom closets-they consume oxygen which is not good as people are sleeping in the bedrooms-call for certifications. Temporary electrical wiring/romex running along the baseboards to a surface mounted electrical outlet-not good. Floor outlets were taboo but I've seen them in new construction lately with screw-in covers. I would call for an electrical certification if I saw a standard outlet installed in the floor-not good.

In row/attached homes, I am wary of wood paneling on a frame party wall. If there is a suspended ceiling and the bedroom is on the top level, I will pop a tile to see if the party wall goes to the roof line, if I can't see it from the attic inspection. Yes, I've seen too many common attics in row homes and a common attic is a fire hazard that needs to be corrected. Usually, the wood paneled party wall will be present in an older row home where the attic has been finished into a bedroom. There is no fire protection for the bedroom occupants if there is only wood paneling on the party wall. I'll get into party wall types when we get to the basement inspection. Since you don't know what's under the wood paneling (hopefully plaster or fire code sheetrock or even if they are present, if they are intact with no holes) I would call for an inspection by the local municipality if there was wood paneling installed on a frame party wall to get them to OK it. I don't want the liability. Let them take the liability for the fire hazard.

In short, you want safe sleeping quarters for the occupants.

That's about all I can think of right now. Hopefully, everyone will add to this list as they have in the past.

I have attached a photo of a house below. The bedrooms run along the rear and side of the home. This home is an FHA reject until the bedroom egress problem is corrected. The windows are awning types and are at ceiling level with no egress possible in case of a fire. You would use VC 11G and condition for new windows to be installed to current egress standards and to be inspected by the municipality. Once a building permit is requested by the owner, the building inspector will insure that the bedroom windows will meet current egress requirements.

http://community.webshots.com/rz/r1/0/10/5...TVWFDyAK_ph.jpg

Remember to write your VC sheet requirements to throw the liability onto the experts via an inspection by them, if the observed problem requires an inspection and a solution by an expert. Yes, you can see and sign off on new carpeting and paint, etc but do you really know if the new windows installed meet current egress requirements????? Let the expert do it for you.

Ben
 

Mountain Man

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
Good list. I have also seen 1 inch holes drilled through the bedroom floor so that the teenager can run all of their computer wires, stereo wires, etc. The whole is just barely big enough to get all of the wire through. But would be plenty big enough for critters to crawl through once the seller removes all of the toys.

If the house does not have HVAC, then it should have window screens for ventilation. This is common in my area with fairly mild summers.

Mell
 

Ben Vukicevich SRA

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
New Jersey
Mell,

Are window screens a requirement in GA (regional requirement for Atlanta HOC)???

They are not a requirement to meet MPS up here.

Ben
 

Brad Pack

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
General Public
State
California
Ben,

Window screens are NOT required for existing housing. New construction is a different story...

Ciao
 

Mountain Man

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
Thanks for the correction Brad, I have been requiring window screens on all homes that do not have HVAC. Not having central heat or air is typical in my area, and I have required screens as it is NOT nice to have critters crawling in bed with you at night. 8O

Mell.
 

Brad Pack

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
General Public
State
California
Mell,

I agree with you. Just because window screens are not a specific MPS does not mean it isn't a safety issue.
Doesn't Georgia have flying insects that are the size of a 182 Cessna. Could be a safety issue for the small child that one of these insects decides to carry off into the night! 8O

Ciao
 

Mountain Man

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
:lol:
Not as bad as Louisiana, but GA does have it’s share. The bugs get worse the further south you go. Down in Wade’s area, the gnats area as big as a pencil eraser and hurt when they smack you in the eye. Actually, in my neighborhood you can’t leave anything open for the black barrrs (local talk for bear).

M.
 

wade3333

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Georgia
Mell, I am going to Black Mountain in North Georgia and I have a good supply of gnats to bring with me. we believe in sharing down here. Wade
 

wade3333

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Georgia
Ben appreciate your post about FHA, I have picked up several pointers, we only get 25.00 extra for an FHA appraisal vs. conventional, if we were as thorough as you we would lose money. However I do not have that many FHA's in my area. Wade
 

Monica (N GA)

Freshman Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Georgia
Mell:

Well atleast they don't drive up and down the road spraying insecticide like they do in Macon. I'd rather have buggies than chemicals messing up my organic garden.
 
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