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Garage, attached or dettached

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Roger R. Patzold

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Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Virginia
A garage is attached to the house but has no weather protected access from the house. It is necessary to go outside to get from the house to the garage or return.

Please indicate if you work in rural, suburban, or urban area as that may have some affect on how you answer the question.

Many thanks to all the people on the forum.

Remember God's gifts are free. We only have to untie the ribbons.
 

BigBlueGA

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
Rural to suburban area - I would call it attached but deduct a little bit of value versus comps with access from the house and explain it pretty thoroughly.
 

Wally Jones

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
Attached.

In our market, I don't believe I'd be able to prove any reaction to a garage with no inside entrance into the house. At the most, you might consider some slight functional obsolescence.

I work all three areas.

Wait. Further reflection reveals...........a seasonal analysis might show such a reaction. In our area, with all the recent rainfall, potential buyers may show a decided preference for not having to get soaked while running to the front door. The same may hold true for northern buyers in the winter, southwestern buyers during dust storms, Martha Stewart avoiding reporters, etc. Durn, now you're gonna make me keep a chart. 8)
 

Tim Hicks (Texas)

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Texas
I assume you are describing a breezeway (covered sidewalk area 4-6 feet wide and anywhere from 5-20 feet long). They are not uncommon in this area and you would be hard pressed to prove in inhibited its market value. The garage utility is still the same (car storage). It looks like a detached garage, but it has this covered area running between the home and the garage. If there is a roof line attaching it to the home, then it is attached. Pretty simple answer. I work in DFW with numerous rural areas surrounding. I can appraise a high rise condo on one day and a ranch on 40 acres the next day(or the same day if I really want to press myself). Aren't all areas like this?
 

Larry Lyke

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2002
Roger --

You didn't ask a question. __A: The garage is considered attached.

"Remember God's gifts are free. We only have to untie the ribbons." ___A: Would you please see to it that I get a gift from god!
 

Judy Whitehead (Florida)

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
I've had several of these lately - I also do not think I prove any market reaction to the lack of covered entry from the garage. I do ALL surburban and rural appraisals. We have no urban areas. I called mine attached. My comps ranged from those with interior entries to comps with carports, rather than garages, etc. In other words, if the house were in an area with all covered or interior entries and this is the odd ball out - then perhaps I would add some functional depreciation to bring it up to par with the others.
 

Richard Carlsen

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Michigan
Low density rural market (upper part of Lower Michigan)

Brandon got it right on the nose.

Attached for cost and URAR data. Minor functional for outside garage entry on attached garage. Did one of these 3 or 4 years ago.

Consider it detached if you adjust for such nonsense in the sales grid.
 

Atlanta CG

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
Just explain it thoroughly, & compare like with like in the sales comparison approach. My experience is that in urban areas it is of concern due to safety issues, but in suburban areas it is less likely a problem - in fact, it tends to create interest as often the garage is set at an angle and the breezeway, also following the same angle, creates architectural merit.
 
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