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Texas Time To Go Solo?

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Marty Shaw

Freshman Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2003
I've seen that in some states there are a minimum number of appraisals a trainee has to do in the company of a mentor and then can go solo afterwards, with mentor still reviewing work, but I can't find any such number for Texas trainees. Is there a set number that has to be supervised?

-Marty
 

George Hatch

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
California
I was kinda hoping I would not have to be the one to answer this question.

We just had a big thread that ended up being about Texas trainees working without either training or supervision. Apparently, all you need are two letters of rejection. You might want to check it out. Look for dezra's thread about "States that offer Provisional Licenses".
 

Marty Shaw

Freshman Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2003
Sorry gang. I think I didn't properly phrase my question the first time around. I don't really want to go straight into business using a provisional license but was curious as to how many times a trainee has to be accompanied by the mentor while on assignment before doing it solo and having the mentor sign off on it.

-Marty
 

Farm Gal

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Nebraska
:p OK George, I'll save you the trouble on this one...

Marty:

the standard answer HAS to be: It Depends

OK figure it this way, folks come to this profession with pre-existing skills in a range from 'empty bag' to my 'kit runneth over with what I need to do this job'.

IF one has significant experience in a few or all the areas needed to competently perform site inspections, the mentor may have a high degree of comfort in letting them 'go solo' in short order! Some states have specific law on this matter, check YOUR area for what legally applies.

Then there is the trickier ethical issues: a trainee should always be monitored and trained until they can perform their work in a competent manner.

so it depends... Dezra's thread pretty well beats all nuances of the Texas law into the ground
~~~~

now for the moldy oldie reminiscing :asleep:
I had inspected and drawn exterior floor plans of somewhere over 14,000 homes, had hands on construction experience, not just knew how to read plans, but had significant experience reading plans and specs and costing them out. I also had significant code, geological hazard, and structural knowledge all pretty atypical of the newbie appraiser.... And in the course of my former employ I had spent time 'guestimating' values and driving around neighborhoods to 'get a feel' for 'general area appeal'. {and NO I wasn't a realtor or realtor assist: some of it was national disaster assistance work}

My mentor was someone I had worked with professionally (as a peer) using those skills. He and I both figured that there was little to be gained by him dogging me on every physical inspection.

I think he inspected three homes with me, then left me to it, unless the home was complex, or he HAD to check the did inspect box.... come to think of it :unsure: this may have predated the lousy 'did inspect' box, AND it was pre-license :p

Back in those days the mentors were protecting their business reputation, which oddly worked better than the licensing laws we have today :angry: ...
 

Restrain

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
You have to be "supervised" for as long as you are a trainee. If you are a trainee under someone else, that somebody has to sign the report. The time frame is a minimum of 2 years and 2000 hours.

That being said, in Texas the appraiser supervisor can turn you loose on day 1 to do reports. I know, I've reviewed some of this #@&%(*@. For a practical matter, the supervising appraiser should accompany you to the point that he or she feels confident in your abilities. However, the supervisor has to turn you loose sometime or another to sink or swim. As to the type of properties, that's going to depend on the client. Some do not want a trainee involved, period. Others don't care so long as the appraiser's signature is attached.

So, the answer depends on a) how good you are and how you've learned the business, B) the confidence the apprasing supervisor has in you, and c) the client requirements.

Hope this helps.

Roger Strahan, Denton, TX
 

dezra

Sophomore Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2002
I'm glad we had the discussion on Texas, though, because it really got things out in the open. It was a good discussion.
 
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