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Training Tips?

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blimp66

Thread Starter
Freshman Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2002
Hello! My name is Dave, and I am a newbie.....I am fortunate enough to have found an appraiser who is willing to train me, and I really want to shoot for perfection. There seems to be soooo much to remember that I was wondering if any of you "seasoned professionals" have any tips or tricks or checklists that might be helpful to a greenhorn such as myself? Any suggestions would be most appreciated!

Thanks, Dave.
 

George Hatch

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
California
Dave,

The first thing is that we don't use screen names on this forum, we use our real names. That's a rule here. It helps keep us honest. When someone says something totally outrageous on this forum (not that you have done that here), the first thing I do is check to see if they are even a licensed or certified appraiser by looking for them on the Appraisal Subcommitee's website. It is amazing how many of the really obnoxious posts on this forum have come from non-appraisers and wanna-be types.


And now, to your question. There are lots of tip and tricks to learn in order to be a better appraiser. Too many to list here. And this is the first tip I'm going to give you:

The one thing about working as a new appraiser is that you will naturally tend to pick up your supervisor's strengths as well as any weaknesses they may (or may not) have. The way to find out where your performance stands in relation to other appraisers as a group is to follow the different forums here. I'm sure I'm not not alone is telling you that I wish such a resource had been available when I was starting out.

Another tip is to take as many courses as you can and pay attention in class. Your main motivation for taking a course should not be to earn the education hours and the certificate, but to absorb the material. Basic, advanced, and continuing education requirements are not a prison sentence to be served, but an opportunity to become a better appraiser. This may sound trite, but your ability to work through a difficult assignment will almost always depend on your knowledge and ability to apply fundamental appraisal theories to the problem. You won't be able to do that as well if your training and orientation is centered around how to properly fill out a form or follow lender guidelines.

The last thing I'd like to point out is that appraisal ethics, USPAP and the laws and regulations that govern your appraisal license are not a joke. You should take them very seriously, even if others around you don't.

Assuming you have the necessary self-discipline, motivation and a modicum of intelligence to work with, if you do these things (read the forums, learn the material, follow the laws), you'll succeed.

Best of luck,

George Hatch
 

Liz South

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Virginia
Just a few quick tips for a newbie:
1. Learn and practice sketching to scale in the field - I have always used graph paper to sketch on - this way I know if my drawing closes or not while I am still at the dwelling.
2. Take copious notes - don't even think you can remember all the specific details about condition, special features, etc when you get back to the office and its been 100 degress like it is right now for most of us.
3. Learn to verify your data and figure out where you can get the most accurate, up to date data -
4. Learn to ask the homeowners questions (I have a homeowner questionaire that I still sometimes use)
5. Be patient with both yourself and your mentor - remember that they are risking their livelihoood to train you so be grateful for what time they give you and the knowledge they share with you.
6. Participate in these forums and with local groups if you have any.
7. Don't pretend that you know everything - ask questions of your mentor or other appraisers every day. Every day I still learn something new or face some different quirk.

Welcome to the fold - ask any questions - you have great resources here with appraisers all over the country monitoring this group.

Liz S.
Still praying for rain (we set a new heat record today 100 degrees)
 

blimp66

Thread Starter
Freshman Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2002
Thanks for the tips Liz! There are so many factors to remember that it is overwhelming sometimes. I appreciate the help.

Cheers, Dave.
 

Terrel L. Shields

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
May 2, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Arkansas
Read text books
learn to word process and write narratives
use your spell checker frequently
study other people's appraisals as often as you can get them. Test them, especially if a sale.
organize with worksheets
Double check your math
keep good books and keep them weekly- getting behind can really cost you.
After finishing a report, test it, step back, think, look, ask yourself what would I give for it ...really. What would I not like about the house and what would I like about the house. What would I do, if I bought it? Spend money on it to fix it up, spend no money on it, tolerate the defects??
 
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