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Upgrades paid by builder-Adjustment?

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Andrew Gall

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Freshman Member
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May 9, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
The subject property is a new construction production built dwelling in Bay Area, CA in a declining market where builder is paying for $77,000 of upgrades which is all the upgrades and giving $15,000 for non-recurring closing costs. The base price and final purchase price is $775,000. I seem to remember that one does not include upgrades unless they are financed. I am concerned that I am incorrect because current listings of the same model new construction home are going for around $656,000. At this point there is no way the purchase price is supported based upon the substitution principle. Anyone help on this regarding upgrades that are not financed?
 

Michael Tipton

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2005
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
I sounds like you are describing a sales price credit by the developer to "gift" the upgrades. I would reduce the sales price to the net sales price and explain how I arrived at the net sales price in the contract review section on page one of the FNMA form, if applicable.

Also disclose the seller paid closing cost credit in the appropriate section of the FNMA form.
 
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Mztk1

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
You are appraising the house, not the contract. If they are not financing upgrades but the upgrades are in the house (or are to be in that house), you are appraising that house with the upgrades regardless.

But on the other hand, if the builder is discounting the price of the upgrades from the price it could be that upgrades do not add value to the house.

Go through your listings and find the ones with a similar amount of upgrading for your comps.
 

Ken B

Elite Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2004
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
Unless one would pay the same price for a property without upgrades as one would pay for a house with upgrades, the upgrades continue to add value. What has declined is the base value of the property.

Builders are "throwing" in upgrades as an "incentive", but it is not a true "concession" as the upgrades are likely to add to value as opposed to, say, 6% of the sale price paid by the builder towards the purchaser's closing costs.

As Jim stated, appraise the house, not the contract.
 

Mike Kennedy

Elite Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
New York
Put the Contract in your bottom draw and lock it ........then appraise the property............... let the MARKET determine the contributory value IF ANY ............for possibly atypical Superadequacy........??

.............

COMPLETE THE CONTRACT ANALYSIS LAST.


"IT IS WHAT IT IS!!!!!" WHETHER UNDER CONTRACT OR NOT.


...........

another illustration of EXACTLY why the USPAP and GSE CONTRACT REVIEW REQUIREMENTS MUST BE ABOLISHED.

Thanks for your post.


Welcome aboard.
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
Florida
Please make sure you do everything you can to find out what similar kinds of concessions were involved in the sales you use as comps and adjust properly for them.
 

Ross (CO)

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Purchase contract review should be a client function ! In many situations it is the CLIENT who provides you that contract. They have ALREADY seen and read it. They know what it says. One SHOULD ask their client......Is this the FINAL contract that you have for me to review ? Wait for the "Yes" reply, or ask the same question a second time.

I'm with Mike on this yet my name for the process is the leave-it-in-the-envelope-until-the-end approach. Faxed contracts are less desired. You complete the entire appraisal first, leaving the contract review task (and respective section of form for that) as the very LAST thing you do before signing-and-sending.

Contract review is a process that can imply a bias upon the appraiser, either at the direction of a participant to the transaction or one's own client, and it needs to be given its appropriate perspective. One is not appraising the contract. If this borrower goes belly-up in 2 years it is not the contract that will get dredged up for scrutiny. It will likely be the appraisal report.
 
Joined
Jun 3, 2005
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
NO ADJUSTMENTS for upgrades! No Adjustments for repairs.

Upgrades improve the quality of the subject property and comparables -- we only adjust for cash concessions.

We adust for cash equivalency -- cash back at closing, seller paid closing costs, seller paid down payment, seller "including" the Mercedes in the garage, HOA fees pre-paid by seller, etc., etc.

The list of concessions we adjust for includes anything that has a direct cash equivalent offset for the buyer at closing; this excludes anything that goes to a third party for work done on the subject property.

There are, however, some items that fall into a gray area -- such as the seller paying points to buy down the buyer's interest rate. Since the cash equivalent benefit to the buyer is spread out over time (it takes 3 to 5 years to recover an interest rate buydown) I'm inclined to not adjust for this type of concession, since the benefit is indirect and not immediate.

The test is -- does the cash concession reduce the buyer's out of pocket expense at closing, and would it be immediately recovered if the buyer turned around and sold the property?

If the answer to both questions is YES, then make the adjustment. If either answer is NO, the adjustment is not warranted.

=======

Some additonal points -- we adjust for the comparables concessions, not the subject property's. The comps either support the purchase price (with or without concessions and upgrades) or they don't; if they don't, the subject is probably over priced or over improved.

That said, I take a dim view of large cash concessions included in purchase agreements, and will generally do a back of the envelope deduction from the purchase price -- the operative word being "large."

I generally consider 20-30% cash concessions way out of line; buyers walking away from closing with big wads of cash is not good either. But in these cases, the appraiser excludes the cash concession in the appraised value, not with a line item concession adjustment.

I will generally support purchase agreements with 3-5% seller concessions, as long as there is strong support from the comparable sales. If it's a low dollar purchase with good support, maybe 10% -- but if the comps don't support the contract price, they definitely don't support the price including concessions.

A big factor that caused the sub prime foreclosure crisis was first time homebuyers with 80/20% ARM loans and seller paid closing costs; this type of buyer often went for the highest priced home, with the concessions added onto the list price. If there wasn't solid support for the value, these buyers were upside down from day one, and were totally screwed when values stopped rising or started to fall.

But once again, this goes back to the ultimate test -- do the comps support the value? Adjust the comps, and ask yourself if the purchase agreement passes the smell test -- do that, and everything else will fall into place.
 
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Mountain Man

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
Adjust the comparables... not the subject.
 

Andrew Gall

Thread Starter
Freshman Member
Joined
May 9, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Thanks all. The upgrades reduce the out of pocket expenses but they are not recoverable in the current declining market. Therefore, I made no adjustment which was fine with my bank client. I ended up appraising the house for well over 100k under the agreed upon sales price due in large part to the current listings of the same model within the development which set the upper end of the value range.
 
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