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Curved Or Flat Monitor?

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JTip

Elite Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Pennsylvania
Pondering on a 30+" for a one screen experience.

Obvious function for production with some side entertainment use.

Price and size are not an issue; I prefer quality and performance over budget minded value.

Thanks fellow nerds.
 

Tom Woolford

Elite Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2005
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
I want one, but its going to wait until I build a new computer this fall. No point in buying a new video card right now than wont have full function and then just have to get a newer one in 6 months. I've been looking at a 34 as I've typically got at least three, sometimes 4 pages open, and in constant use. I've been using three for about 9 years now, and just one really wide monitor has a real appeal.
 

TRESinc

Elite Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2011
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Ohio
no real experience with a curved monitor but i can tell you that i do not like the curved tvs. a friend has one that is the same size as my non-curved, and to my eyes it is significantly smaller. it also cuts down on the side viewable area. same thing i felt when i was looking at them in the store. it may be different with a monitor as it is only a couple feet from your face vs the distance for a tv though.

i don't do anything graphic-intensive on my machine. sketches are about the most graphic-intensive thing i do on my computer. based on that i just don't see a need personally for a super high-res, expensive monitor (or two really). i run a pair of 32" tvs for my monitors and they cost me less than $400 for both when i bought them a few years back. now a 32" tv can be had for $100 or less for the offbrands.
 

J Grant

Elite Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
I got a curved monitor recently, not too expensive (samsung) and love it, easier on eyes re reading left to right
 

Mike Kennedy

Elite Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
New York
  1. Curved monitors gaming | Rock, Paper, Shotgun
    www.rockpapershotgun.com/2015/06/25/curved-monitors-...
    Jun 25, 2015 ... Why curved screens are good for gaming but bad for desktop work. ... With flat 34 -inch super-side screens, the far edges can feel awfully oblique and almost redundant. ... far edges, but they certainly sit more naturally in your peripheral vision. ... alternatives, many of which are cheaper and potentially better.
 

Robert McGaughey

Freshman Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Texas
I have a Dell 34" curved monitor and it is nice. However, it is wide but only 13" tall and I still wanted additional room. I bought a Samsung 50" 4k TV last Thanksgiving and have been using it as my monitor. I really enjoy it. Very crisp text and lots of room. Probably cheaper than a wide monitor as well. Best of luck!
 

conwayblue

Sophomore Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Arkansas
I'm thinking of going PLP (portrait - landscape - portrait) with a 34" ultrawide 1440p monitor in the center and two 24" 1080p monitors in portrait on the sides. Tie fighter style! Leaning towards the Dell U3417W for the center.
 

Randall Garrett

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2004
Professional Status
IT Professional-Appraisal Related
State
Texas
Before purchasing an "Ultrawide" monitor (usually 21:9 aspect ratio), I recommend that you pay attention to Robert McGaughery's post. The problem with most 21:9 monitors is their physical height - it feels like you're looking through a slit, so to speak. A lot of appraisal work involves vertical scrolling and this aspect ratio exacerbates the problem. I am no longer actively appraising, but I still run a lot of appraisal software on a fairly routine basis (testing) and I gave up on 21:9 monitors very quickly. I also have used UHD TV's and some will work OK for that, but many do not support a true 4:4:4 chroma spec )https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chroma_subsampling) and this basically means that while they may look nice on video, static text can be fuzzy. Hence, if you're going to spend some serious money, do your research and read about whether or not the TV has true 4:4:4 chroma support!

For MY money, I switched over to 40" - 43" monitors as being the best bang for the buck. I have purchased several from various manufacturers. The one that I have used the most is by Philips but that model is no longer produced :-( Most have moved to a 43" panel and the one with the best combination of price, quality and reliable support is the Dell P4317Q which generally runs under $1,000 - it is commonly available in the $972 -$1,118 range. Amazon has it for $989.99: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01FM3IPS8/?tag=realestatappraat If you must have a curved monitor, this is the 4O" curved version (I have not used this monitor myself): https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N4KA2EL/?tag=realestatappraat Be aware that to properly drive a 4K monitor, you must use HDMI 2.0 or a DisplayPort 1.2 . Unless you configure it properly, you will not get the full resolution (usually the reason behind moist of the few negative reviews on this sort of product - i.e. the user did not know how to hook it up.) MOST modern laptops and desktops will drive a "4K" monitor (properly, they are actually UHD, not real 4K) with ease, so you most likely do not need a super graphics card for business use (if you are gaming, you'll want dual "big boy" cards, LOL) - just look up the specs on your laptop or built-in video card. I run my UHD monitors from even my ancient Surface Tablets with regularity... :)

Nearly $1K may seem like a lot of money (and it is), but a good monitor is something you use almost constantly - get a good one and do your eyes a favor. Get the right combination and you'll be miles ahead with respect to productivity instead of having to ditch the crummy one and start over. Just my 2¢...

Hope this helps!


-Randall Garrett-
+Apex Software+

/end/
 

JTip

Elite Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Pennsylvania
I ended up purchasing the LG 29UM68-P for a buck under three (fs/notx). I paid more for the router (TPlink AD7200.....just awesome) :)

With help from a tile manager (thanks mick), every inch of the screen is utilized with multiple sized windows.

I was a bit afraid to commit to a four digit purchase on a monitor until I could experience the 'one screen' user again (after being on two for years, work and pt work). I developed a fondness for having independent screens, so this 'entry level' unit will see if I can be productive and entertained at the same time. :)

I'm using my x360 (i7, 8g ram, 256 ssd and, I think, an Intel 560 vid card) as the 'tower' and running the LG via HDMI (with impressive results) along with BT K800 keyboard (how about an awesome keyboard) and regular guy mouse. (thanks again to mick for the 'plan').

And to think I grew up with a TRS-80 with a cassette tape.......
 
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