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FHA And Retainer Blocks?

Can FHA require landscaping wood, not fences and unattached never painted, to be painted?

  • Yes

    Votes: 1 5.9%
  • No

    Votes: 10 58.8%
  • It's the government, they don't make any sense and do whatever they want without logic

    Votes: 4 23.5%
  • Take it to court and find out

    Votes: 2 11.8%

  • Total voters
    17
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YouAreCEO

Freshman Member
Joined
May 15, 2017
Professional Status
General Public
State
Michigan
So a weird question from a former agent and mortgage broker now a buyer (me):

FHA asked for a million things painted, no surprise there, to close on my Michigan duplex. I was surprised they wanted a large drain pipe repainted, but what really got me is this:

Wooden retaining blocks, which keep the soil in the landscape back, not attached to dwelling and impossible they were installed before 1978, are unpainted and never have been painted.

FHA appraiser wants these blocks PAINTED, and referred to them as "cement blocks." The question is, can they do this? Of course, the government can make anyone do virtually anything. But, is this customary?

Fences attached, I get. Detached fences,maybe. But landscaping not within 100 feet of the dwelling? COME ON. Thoughts?
 

YouAreCEO

Freshman Member
Joined
May 15, 2017
Professional Status
General Public
State
Michigan
And I might add, don't "DUH" me and tell me the seller has to fix anyway. This is a curiosity and a fine example of good government ideas gone stupid.
 

Meandering

Elite Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2006
Professional Status
Real Estate Agent or Broker
State
Pennsylvania
YouAreCEO, said:

a former agent and mortgage broker
Wooden retaining blocks,
which keep the soil in the landscape back,

not attached to dwelling and impossible
they were installed before 1978,
are unpainted and never have been painted.
FHA appraiser wants these blocks PAINTED,
and referred to them as "cement blocks." The question is, can they do this?

:nono:

Now you should know it's only the lending side that can require anything, as everything else is wave able.

IF the lender want it painted, that's what you got to do to get the loan.

So 40 year old wood blocks stacked within and touching soil, have not been maintained, and.............
if they rot, will the soil they are retaining pose a hazard to the house or other property?

FHA new regulations are 4000.1

Safety, soundness, security, minimum property requirements, that's what we report. The lender decides what "has to" be fixed or painted.

.

.
 

YouAreCEO

Freshman Member
Joined
May 15, 2017
Professional Status
General Public
State
Michigan
Well, I am sorry I used this forum. Poking fun of me not knowing better doesn't help anyone, and is just poor form Marion!
And you don't need to lecture me the lender decides, but they are following what Ellie Mae wants. Which you should know.
I see I've made a mistake asking help from a forum where novice is unwelcome and easy flame-bait. My apologies, I will take my ball and go home after this rousing Reddit.

Now let me tell you what is wrong with your facts, because you nitpicked something that you see as a typo or implication:
I said: impossible they were installed prior to 1978
What you did: bold typeface, inserting a para-graphical pause insinuating I said they were installed before 1978
Then you: Said they were 40 years old, which I never said. You also said they have not been maintained, which I never said. They aren't unsound or rotting* (footnote here).
Such a fine example of contextual editing, you should work for the news media.

Now that we've cleared the personal air, and gotten our facts straight...:nono: the house was built in 1939, which makes lead paint an issue in FHA's eyes.

Painting is the issue. And I said 1978 because their issue would be lead based paint concern, not condition.

The issue here is paint won't help a landscape a darn bit. Painting retaining blocks isn't helping the real issue if there is a condition concern of rotting. If they really cared for the right reason, it would be FIX THEM not paint them TRUST ME. This appraiser just went through the motions, not that he's supposed to be a maintenance expert.

Thanks for the attempt at help, but no thanks for the "warm welcome" and BOO! for flaming a new user. Shame SHAME, says The High Sparrow. UNFOLLOWED, thumbs down and I am out.
 

YouAreCEO

Freshman Member
Joined
May 15, 2017
Professional Status
General Public
State
Michigan
And then perhaps you will directly answer my question, clearly is this common or standard. But I suppose I should know 4000.1 because I had an appraisal license or certification at any point in my life. WAIT... just no.
 

YouAreCEO

Freshman Member
Joined
May 15, 2017
Professional Status
General Public
State
Michigan
Oh never-mind you are more insistent in defending this appraiser's liability, even though that was not a concern for me - and he can't tell wood from cement. Great appraising! Now get it over with and ban me already. We've both got better things to do.
 
D

Deleted member 134708

Guest
So a weird question from a former agent and mortgage broker now a buyer (me):

FHA asked for a million things painted, no surprise there, to close on my Michigan duplex. I was surprised they wanted a large drain pipe repainted, but what really got me is this:

Wooden retaining blocks, which keep the soil in the landscape back, not attached to dwelling and impossible they were installed before 1978, are unpainted and never have been painted.

FHA appraiser wants these blocks PAINTED, and referred to them as "cement blocks." The question is, can they do this? Of course, the government can make anyone do virtually anything. But, is this customary?

Fences attached, I get. Detached fences,maybe. But landscaping not within 100 feet of the dwelling? COME ON. Thoughts?

I wouldn't of called for it.

Speaking as a civilian who hates seeing fellow Americans screwed out of money, maybe this appraiser, like many do, are extorting you for extra money. They are going to get paid another $150 to come back out.

Not saying you can win, but I'd love to see you win in small claims court and get your money back and then some.

In fact, I just had a final inspection come over where I wasn't the original appraiser. This was a conventional loan. I saw the engagement letter and guidelines. This appraiser on their own, when no one asked for it, made this home owner get a new garage entry door because it had a cat door cut into it. This appraiser just extorted another $200 from the homeowner for a 2nd visit.

This happens way too much and no one says anything. Appraisers inside secret? In this case, Zero people asked for this item to be repaired. The appraiser took it upon themselves. Doing the right thing or collecting $200? I'd love for a judge to be the judge.
 

YouAreCEO

Freshman Member
Joined
May 15, 2017
Professional Status
General Public
State
Michigan
Thanks for a real reply, nottrav!
 

CANative

Elite Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2003
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
California
Mortgagee's (Lenders) responsibility:

Lead-Based Paint
The Mortgagee must confirm that the Property is free of lead paint hazards.

Appraisers Responsibility:

i. Lead-Based Paint Improvements Built on or Before 1978

The Appraiser must note the condition and location of all defective paint and require repair in compliance with 24 CFR § 200.810(c) and any applicable EPA requirements. The Appraiser must observe all interior and exterior surfaces, including common areas, stairs, deck, porch, railings, windows and doors, for defective paint (cracking, scaling, chipping, peeling, or loose). Exterior surfaces include those surfaces on fences, detached garages, storage sheds, and other outbuildings and appurtenant Structures.

The appraiser may have been a little hyper on this but not a lot hyper. It doesn't matter if something is brand new and has defective paint. If the residence was built on or before '78 everything has to be subjected to the LBP protocols.

In this case your ire is mis-directed. The Direct Endorsement Underwriter has the final say on this and could have easily overridden the appraisal condition with the stroke of a pen.
 
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